Steps to Knowledge - The Book of Inner Knowing

Step 20

I Will Not Let Doubt And Confusion Slow My Progress.

What can slow your progress but your own indecision, and what can breed indecision save that which produces confusion of mind? You have a greater goal which is being illustrated in this program of preparation. Do not let doubt and confusion be an obstruction to you. To be a true student means that you are assuming very little and that you are directing yourself in a manner that you do not prescribe for yourself but which is given to you from a Greater Power. The Greater Power wishes to raise you to its own level of ability. In this way, you receive the gift of preparation so that you may give it to others. In this way, you are given that which you cannot provide for yourself. You realize your individual power and ability because they must be developed in order for you to follow a program of this nature. You also realize your inclusion in life as life strives to serve you in your true development.

Therefore, practice the same practice that you attempted in the previous day in your two practice periods, and do not let doubt or confusion dissuade you. Be a true student today. Allow yourself to concentrate on your practice. Give yourself to practice. Be a true student today.

Practice 20: Two 15-minute practice periods.

 

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Steps to Knowledge was received in 1989 by modern day prophet Marshall Vian Summers, and has been translated into 12 languages.

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